Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass - Fredrick Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

By Fredrick Douglass

  • Release Date: 2011-01-17
  • Genre: Biographies & Memoirs
4.5 Score: 4.5 (From 555 Ratings)

Description

This autobiography is the first book from the brilliant writer, advocate, and abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Relating the story of Douglass’ life from his birth into slavery to his escape and first few years of freedom, this account became instrumental in stirring up anti-slavery sentiments before the Civil War. Douglass is born a slave in eastern Maryland, never knowing his father and separated from his mother as a young child. When his owner’s wife begins to teach him to read, and is subsequently chastised for it, Douglass discovers that the path to freedom is through education. His young life is a constant battle against injustice, peaking with an intense fight against the brutal slave driver Mr. Covey. Yet Douglass manages to free himself from captivity and devote his life to freeing others. It’s a chilling reminder of the horrors of slavery and an inspirational portrait of a great mind triumphing over oppressive forces.

Reviews

  • Compelling

    5
    By scarter3509
    A testimony of true strength and determination in the presence of evil and injustice against humanity.
  • Sup

    5
    By wzerxtcyvubio
    It was good
  • I finally read this

    5
    By LunaLingua
    In this short book, Frederick Douglass has made it possible to see slavery from the slave’s perspective. He is clear, concise, and unabashedly factual. On a persoanl note, I wish I had read this so long ago, back when I avoided reading – and this book puts my former dislike for the effort of reading to shame, as literacy was his key to freedom, and I once treated it like a waste of time.
  • Amazing !!!!!!!

    5
    By Nowannasin
    This book is more then amazing!!!!!!!
  • Worthwhile read for any American Christian

    4
    By Ericthered65
    A worthwhile read for anyone/everyone interested in an eyewitness account of slavery in the U.S. I was particularly interested in the intersection of Christianity and southern slavery, and how Douglass noted that at least on one occasion, the 'conversion' of his master made him more wicked and cruel because he used the bible to justify his wickedness whereas before he used his depravity. While I would not say that true christianity were absent from the states (northern or southern) at that time, his correct rebuke of the faux Christianity that knowingly endorsed and covered over the sin of man-stealing chattel slavery is well put. It's a good thing that religionists today are not using pious language to justify and solemnify what any objective review would show to be utterly immoral and on all points at odds with the Christ and the Scriptures.
  • What a good book!

    5
    By So any Game
    This is an excellent narrative (especially in its original version). I recommend that every living soul read it!!!!
  • Waited too long.

    5
    By sg
    I read this for a class. Though I wished I would have read 20 years ago. A first person account of what it was like at the time of shame in our country's history and how against odds one survived. Thoughts on man, religion and freedom that I will remember forever.
  • Timeless Piece

    5
    By Esidous
    This book not only calls the morality of a nation to the carpet... It also questions the motivating factors whether religion, economics, or simply white supremacy.
  • Great

    5
    By jcesarp
    Great narrative by one of the classic negro heroes
  • The Narrative Life of Fredrick Douglas

    5
    By Lvp43
    This is a must read book. It will keep you on the edge of your seat because it is such a thought provoking, up close view of slavery and the manipulative approaches utilized to support the continuous of such an egregious offense to African Americans. At times, it is a heartbreaking reality that one must place it down but the pull of wanting to get to the end will make you pick it back up. So very many psychosocial manipulative games were utilized which were designed to make the slaves believe that they were destined to remain in bondages of captivity.

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